Adaptation in Action: States take action on climate change to protect public health

Date: Apr 25 2018

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Louise Dettman, 202-777-2509

New report from APHA highlights efforts to meet the health challenges of climate change

Washington, D.C., April 25, 2018 – The American Public Health Association builds on the momentum of its Year of Climate Change and Health with the release of a new report, with support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Adaptation in Action: Updated Grantee Success Stories from CDC's Climate and Health Program, Part II" highlights U.S. states that have responded successfully to the effects of climate change on health.

Climate change is bringing rising temperatures; increased risk of floods, droughts and wildfires; and more extreme weather events that have consequences for our health. To help states and cities prepare for and respond to these challenges, CDC developed a unique framework through its Climate-Ready States and Cities Initiative.

By following the BRACE, or Building Resilience Against Climate Effects, framework, public health practitioners can develop ways to anticipate the health effects of climate change by applying the best climate science available, predicting health impacts and preparing programs to protect the communities served.

"As an APHA priority, we believe in the need for strong climate change strategies and interventions that protect people's health," said APHA Executive Director Georges Benjamin, MD. "The public health community plays a critical role."

APHA and CDC released the first Adaptation in Action report in 2015 to profile the work of five states and two cities. This year’s report highlights nine states and incorporates new information on climate justice, mental wellness and vulnerable populations.

To complement the release of this report, APHA and CDC are hosting the webinar Climate Changes Health: Adaptation in Action on April 26 from 1-2 p.m. EDT. The webinar will provide information about the BRACE framework and share climate adaptation steps taking place in Wisconsin, Oregon and Maryland to prevent the health threats related to climate change.

You can follow the conversation on social media using the hashtag #ClimateChangesHealth. For more information on how climate change impacts health and to view the Adaptation in Action, Part II report, visit www.apha.org/climate. And view other webinars on climate change.

###

APHA champions the health of all people and all communities. We are the only organization that influences federal policy, has a nearly 150-year perspective and brings together members from all fields of public health. Learn more at www.apha.org.