Special supplement to American Journal of Public Health focuses on high risk adolescent pregnancy prevention

Date: Feb 14 2018

CONTACT: For copies of articles, contact Megan Lowry, 202-777-3913. 

Washington, D.C., February 14, 2018 — A special supplement to the American Journal of Public Health published today explores updated perspectives and new research on high risk adolescent pregnancy prevention. Articles in this open-access supplement discuss the measurable impacts of sexual health education and unintended pregnancy prevention programming, reducing disparities in adolescent pregnancy and engaging new and more populations in prevention efforts.

New research published in the supplement includes “Effects of a Teen Pregnancy Prevention Intervention on Youth Living in Group Care Homes: Results of a Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial,”  “Reaching High-Need Youth With Evidence-Based Sexual Health Education: Lessons Learned from Implementing the State Personal Responsibility Education Program in California” and a systematic review entitled, “Building Bridges to a Brighter Tomorrow: A Systematic Review of Interventions that Prepare Adolescents for Adulthood.”

The issue also includes several editorials drawing on field research and lessons learned in-practice that discuss supporting vulnerable youth, reducing disparities in adolescent pregnancy, ethnicity and acculturation in sexual health communication, contraceptives and engaging young men in prevention efforts.

External funding support for this supplement was provided by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Administration for Children & Families, Family and Youth Services Bureau, Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Program, Washington, D.C.

Find a full list of AJPH papers published in this special supplement below:

  • Building Bridges To a Brighter Tomorrow: A Systematic Review of Interventions That Prepare Adolescents for Adulthood
  • Effects of a Teen Pregnancy Prevention Intervention on Youth Living In Group Care Homes: Results of a Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial
  • Reaching High-Need Youth with Evidence-Based Sexual Health Education: Lessons Learned from Implementing the State Personal Responsibility Education Program in California
  • A Holistic Approach to Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Among Vulnerable Youth
  • Engaging Young Minority Fathers to Decrease Sexual Risk Behavior: Lessons Learned from a Fatherhood Intervention
  • Adolescent Mothers' Awareness of the Prematurity Risk Associated With a Brief Interpregnancy Interval: Preliminary Findings and Future Directions
  • Teen Pregnancy Prevention in Group Homes: Recruiting and Retention Considerations
  • Reward Seeking and Self-Regulation: Changing the Environment to Prevent Adolescent Pregnancy
  • Is Current Measurement of Contraception Use Hindering Identification of Evidence-Based Pregnancy Prevention for Vulnerable Teens?
  • Supporting Vulnerable Youth Through Community Collaboration
  • Considering the Role of Ethnicity and Acculturation in Parent/Child Communication About Sexual Health
  • Reducing Disparities Among Tribal Youth: Lessons Learned from the Front Lines of Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Programs
  • Reducing Adolescent Sexual Health Disparities: Where Do We Go from Here?
  • Three Important Lessons from Research Published in This Supplement: A Call to Action Related to Programming, Research and Public Policy

These articles were published online February 14, 2018, at 4 p.m. EST by AJPH. AJPH is published by the American Public Health Association and is available at www.ajph.org. This issue is open-access and available to the public. 

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The American Journal of Public Health is the monthly journal of the American Public Health Association. APHA champions the health of all people and all communities. We strengthen the public health profession. We speak out for public health issues and policies backed by science. We are the only organization that influences federal policy, has a nearly 150-year perspective and brings together members from all fields of public health. Visit www.apha.org.